Tuesday, 9 June 2009

Love my loopy lupins

Are they not beautiful? The bees love them, so do I.
The Iris flowers are also coming into their own. Now onto some plants you can 'eat'
Is it a mangetout? No it's my Ambassador peas, still a little way to go before the pods start developing, but its starting to look edible.
Even some of the potatoes are beginning to flower. The impatient and eager person in me, got D to lift a plant as I was being optimistic that there would be enough for a meal, but there were about 5 potatoes, the size of pebbles, not enough for one person, forget four people. So I will be good now and wait another month.
These are my strawberries growing in recycled tubs above the ground. No sign of slugs, I guess it too high for them to climb and they get all giddy. Good!
These strawberries are growing in one of the beds, they are doing really well, just not red or edible yet. I think I may have to cover them with netting this weekend, as I am sure the birds are waiting with me for them to redden and be fat and juicy.
This is what Plot 45 looked like on Saturday. However, on Sunday afternoon, my father-in-law cleared the pathway of all its weeds, whilst I was working at Plot 11. It looks in great shape. Thank you!

8 comments:

  1. Really fabulous photos today. Your potatoes and peas are so much further on than ours, but I can identify with the pebble sized ones. We had a lot of 'volunteers' this year, which I dug up a week ago. I should have left them in another fortnight!

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  2. It must take lots of time to run an allotment - how often do you have to visit to keep things in check? Daily at this time of year? I'd quite like an allotment but not sure I have the time to do it properly. Would be interested to know how much effort it is vs joy it gives!

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  3. I am amazed at the variety of plants taht you are growing! Very impressive.

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  4. reapwhatyougrow,

    Thank you. Glad to know that I am not the only impatient one when it comes to digging up potatoes.

    goodshoeday,

    I work full-time (sometimes flexible hours), so I really am a weekend allotemnter. At present I can cope with the two plots, as I do not have much of a social life, nor any children or family commitments, but things could change. I also don't have many holidays. It is hard work, especially this time of the year, I have to go after work to feed the plants and the bigger jobs get done over the w/e with D, my husband.

    I would encourage everybody who wants to grow and eat fresh seasonal produce to put their name down for a plot. I think you'd love it, though it is really really hard work, but the rewards are immeasurable. If you think the work would be too much for you to cope with, think about part-sharing with a friend, this works for a number of people.

    I really really enjoy it and would be at a loss if I gave up my plot.

    Michele,

    Yeah, I can't believe I planted so many veg either. I am beginning to run out of room - even with two plots!

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  5. thanks for the thoughts on the work involved in a lottie. I'm going to see what the waiting list is like round here and then take it from there.

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  6. goodshoeday,
    Good idea to put your name on a list, you could be waiting years or you could get lucky and just be waiting months. Keep us all posted on what happens.

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  7. wow, you are so lucky to have your own vegetable garden. We have so much room to grow veggies in our yard, and the plots, but our soil is dreadful - even replacing the soil doesnt work! I dont even seem to be able to grow strawberries in pots :(
    Freshly grown veggies always taste the best :)

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  8. Thank you Rose,
    Unfortunately this is not in my back garden, though I wish it was. This plot is based at an allotment site, where it can be hit and miss with the soil. I have two plots, the first one is awful boggy. The second is spendid.

    Over the past two years, I have been lucky to be able to grow good veg at the plot, save lots of pennies.

    At home I have a small plot, where I manage to herbs, salad leaves, courgettes (zuchinni)and strawberries, blueberries in pots. I don't know what else to say, except try again with growing strawberries in pots, and with the soil in your garden maybe create some beds and add some compost to it. It may work. Just don't give up and Good luck.

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