Sunday, 7 June 2015

Turmeric Butter Beans with Dill, Garlic and Eggs

I have a number of vegetarian and non-vegetarian Middle Eastern cookbooks on my burgeoning bookshelf.  The most cherished and celebrated perhaps are those by: Nada Saleh, Arto der Haroutunian, Claudia Roden, Greg and Lucy Malouf amongst a handful of others.

Anyway, the one Middle Eastern recipe that  I've had bookmarked is not from a cook book, but a blog called Bottom of the Pot.  In fact I have had this Persian recipe for Spring Fava Bean (Broad Beans), Dill and Egg Stew  known as Baghali Ghatogh bookmarked for over two year ago.  I was greedily reminded of it when I was at the library and was flicking through Sabrina Gayour cookbook Persiana.  My version is visually probably more closer to Sabrina's as I was cautious with the dill, but the recipe I followed and adapted a little was definitely from Bottom of the Pot.  Dill is not a herb I use much in my cooking and was nervous about overpowering the dish with a herb that I am not overly fussed about.  
One of the reasons this recipe was on the back burner was that I was waiting for the broad beans season. Well fortunately for me, I  had picked up some broad beans from a rural market, but it was not enough for this recipe, so I  decided to substituted it with some dried butter beans, which I soaked overnight and then cooked. 



And then I followed the recipe, adapting it a little (see below).  
Turmeric Butter Beans with Dill, Garlic and Eggs
Serves 2 - 4
Ingredients
175g dried butter beans, soaked overnight.  Then drained and cook in water until tender. Drain and set aside.

3 - 4 tablespoon olive oil
4 garlic cloves, crushed
2 spring onions, finely sliced
1 - 2 teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Bunch of fresh dill, finely chopped plus extra for garnish
100ml vegetable stock
50g of butter
4  eggs
Optional: Feta cheese for serving
Method
In a wide pan, heat the oil, then stir in the garlic until soft and translucent.  Then stir in the beans and cook for a few minutes, before stirring in the turmeric, seasoning, dill (bit at a time if you are like me, bit cautious) and stock. Bring to a simmer and stir now and again, but not too much as the butter beans must retain their shape.  
Allow the stock to reduce, taste and adjust seasoning if necessary.  
Add the butter and allow to melt, then crack the eggs into the pan and put the lid on.  Cook until the eggs begin to set, this may take up to 10 minutes.  
Serve sprinkled with extra dill and optional feta cheese.
I was not completely sure how to serve the finished dish, it was only later on  thanks to Naz that I realised it was typically served with rice, but the following day I  decided to serve it as a brunch dish with some sliced roasted potatoes. It was different and rather delicious.  I would describe it as an Iranian or Persian Shakshuka.  I am so wishing to make this dish again, but this time will have to be with fresh broad beans and there will be plenty around soon.  This recipe was made by fellow blogger Rainbow Chard.

I have another bookmarked recipe that will be showcased tomorrow as I soaked an entire packet of dried butter beans, but if you wish to make the authentic recipe for Broad Beans, Dill and Egg Stew  known as Baghali Ghatogh  a go, then follow the link; or Sabrina Ghayour version of Broad Beans with Garlic, Dill and Eggs.  I am sharing my version with Dom over at Belleau Kitchen for Simply Eggcellent: Anything Goes Challenge; and Tinned Tomatoes for Meat Free Mondays. 

18 comments:

  1. That genuinely looks like such a delicious dish. I love how rustica it looks and how amazing those golden eggs look cooked on top of the dish. I know what you mean about how overpowering dill can be but I'm glad it worked. Thanks so much for entering into Simply Eggcellent x

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    1. Thank you so much Dom. I was really pleased with it and it really was comforting to tuck into too. If you like Moroccan Baked Eggs aka Shakshuka, then you will love these. I describe them almost as Persian or Iranian Shakshouka. I will be making it again for sure, just want to get some broad beans this time round.

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  2. I seem to be headed for a bumper crop of fava beans this year so I think I might give the original version a go, it looks and sounds delicious!

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    1. Lucky you, I only have a handful of broad bean plants, so will be picking it up from the market. I too will be giving the original a go, hope you like.

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  3. I think you are right about the beans - young Broad Beans would give this dish a much fresher feel than the dried Butter Beans. I'm not a fan of Dill at the best of times, so I think I would replace it with Parsley.

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    1. I will def be giving it a go with fresh broad beans and a lot more dill, can't wait actually. Yes parsley would be a good sub for dill.

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  4. Lovely, Shaheen! I'm thrilled you made and enjoyed my baghali ghatogh. Traditionally we enjoy this dish as a stew served over rice or served with bread. The rice and bread help soak up all the lovely juices. But, I love that you served it with some potatoes for brunch. It's a simple and delicious meal. Let me know how it turns next time you make it!

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    1. Oh I am humbled, thank you so much for sharing such a glorious recipe. I promise to follow the recipe next time as I am quite excited to try it with broad beans and serve it the way you have recommended. I have a number of other recipes of yours bookmarked, I will let you know as and when I make them. Once again thank you for the Persian inspiration in my kitchen, and I will let you know when I make the original version, which will not be too long now.

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  5. I love dill and will definitely be trying this recipe. My broad beans are doing well so far, but I am not counting my chickens (broad beans) before they are hatched (on the plate). x

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    1. Oh good, please do - I am hoping to make it again too, this time for sure with broad beans. I hope your broad beans reward you, I only have four, maybe six plants, but I am not that optimistic, so i will be buying in. Do hope your well, its always good to hear from you (even though blogger for some reason gets temperamental with comments).

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  6. Aha, yesterday I picked my first broads beans from the plot and thought I'd drop by and see what recipes you had. I am not disappointed! This sounds much more interesting than the usual broad bean soup I make.

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    1. Oh I am envying you, but I am pleased that your have your own homegrown broad beans. And please do not blitz your broad beans to soup, that would be a shame, please make Naz's recipe and I am sure you will not be disappointed. I am waiting to get my hands on some local broad beans too, so that I can give it a go at home too.
      And thank you for your kind words x

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    2. I Did make this lovely dish with my beans....twice! Thanks for sharing it. I love really quick and easy dishes especially this time of year. I've posted about it today too. http://rainbowchard.blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/harvest-monday-broad-bean-stew.html

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    3. Twice Wow. I am coming on over.

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  7. I love your version of this recipes. It really sounds so good. And it is really like a Persian shakshuka: That's actually what I thought when I first saw the images! I am reading this while hungry. Exquisite torture. :)

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    1. Oh Thank you Kellie, Made me smile with 'exquisite torture'. Hope your well.

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