Saturday, 21 November 2009

Modes of transport

It is extremely wet today, with the rain showing no signs of stopping. So we gave the allotment a miss and decided to visit one of the city's Museum. The Museum of Transport. Now I know what you may be thinking, transport - vintage cars, motorcycles and bikes what's that got to do with an allotment or food blog, and the truth is nothing. I can't even say that I am into fast cars or motorbikes because I am not, though I did go through a phase in my teenage days of liking motor bikes, but that was only because I had the eyes for a biker boy then.

Anyway, the reason we decided to go to the Museum of Transport was twofold. We wanted to get out of the flat, but it was raining, so it had to be indoors and second it was free. Actually it wasn't too bad at all. Plenty to see if your into cars, trains, aeroplanes, ships, cycles and so on, but I promise I won't bore you with too many transport photos. I left those for D and selected a few I liked that may be of interest.
This is a painting of the Glasgow Underground fondly known by the name of 'Clockwork Orange' because of its carmine-red colour. I was struck by how much the image looked like a poster advertising a movie. Some of you may be wondering why is it called 'The Clockwork Orange', its origins are split between the infamous Stanley Kubrik 1971 movie adaptation of a book with the same name, and a one-liner made by the then chairman of British Rail, Sir Peter Parker, who referred to the system as "the original Clockwork Orange". Which is true, who knows?
This is a painting depicting a bustling city scene of when there used to be tramways and the Scottish weather - do you see the lady in red with the umbrella? Some things never change.
Here are some actual Glasgow trams. Alongside the old modes of transport were vehicles from other parts of the world, or depicting those found in other parts of the world, such as 'rickshaws' and this van.
Its not actually from Pakistan. It's been designed by students from the Glasgow School of Art in the traditions of 'pakistani art'.
What I liked about this particular vehicle was the stickers glowed in the dark, now that appeals to the kid in me.
Faslane caravan. I liked the message.
Elegant women on bicycles. Oh there were even some prams displayed - well it is a mode of transport for the little ones.
There were a few old signs dotted about.
I came across a section that moved away from showcasing transport. It showed a street called Kelvin Street. It definitely was atmospheric.
It was perhaps my favourite part of the museum.
This Continental cafe actually reminds me one of one called the University cafe on Byres Road when I was a student in Glasgow.
I liked these boxes too.
Lipton Tea boxes.
Some familiar, some unfamiliar food jars and boxes displayed in one of the windows.
When we got home I made a quick dish of cauliflower pasta bake. Most people have a good cauliflower pasta bake recipe, so I won't be posting recipe, but the one thing I did do slightly differently was add a generous pinch of cayenne pepper to the sauce. It was just what we wanted after a rainy cold day out.

4 comments:

  1. It looks like a great trip to the museum. The lipton tea boxes are great, and the old trams. We still have old trams running where i live, on Sundays only though-they are much too noisy.
    The pasta bake looks delicious!

    Rose

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  2. Thanks Rose.
    The lipton tea boxes were my favourite find too.

    I know what you mean about noisy. I have a busy railtrack behind my flat and it constantly shakes the building.

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  3. Great article, I love the 'pakistani art' painted cars made by the Glasgow School of Art... and the old signs and packaging look amazing too! there are so many cultural hints and stories narrated within one simple tea box for example :)

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  4. Thank you so much Elena for your comment.

    I really enjoy looking beyond the 'boxes' and looking a little more at the detail, such as the cultural hints and stories as you rightly pointed out. Sometimes these things are overlooked.

    And thank you so much for becoming a follower. I am humbled.

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