Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Irn Bru Jelly Suitable for Vegetarians

If you are Scottish, forgive me for preaching to the already knowing - but this part of the post is written for my non-Scots readers or those who may not have come across Irn Bru before.  Irn Bru pronounced Iron Brew is Scotland's unofficial national drink, a fizzy bright orange non-alcoholic  beverage.
Such is its popularity in Scotland that not a day went by when I saw a young Scot guzzling it down his throat at the bus stop, as if it were milk.  When I lived in Glasgow, I would often witness a young man in a tracksuit on his way to work strutting a large bottle of Irn Bru under his armpits.  Or in the evening on my way back home, ned and nedettes eating curry'n'chips and swigging from a can of Irn Bru.   Oh such sights I do not miss.  I had enjoyed watching the humorous Irn Bru ads though, many of which can be found on youtube.  

I was also always amused when our American friends come over, they always take back a can of Irn Bru - I am surprised its gets past customs and then surprised it didn't burst on the journey.
Before I go on to share more about the Irn Bru Jelly, I must make a point about soft non-alcoholic drinks.  You know the way some alcoholic beverages are not suitable for vegetarians and vegans, well this can also be the case for soft drinks.  A number of soft drinks for example may use food dyes such as cochineal, which gives drinks a orange glow in the dark colouring. I know it sounds a bit silly, but I would never had thought that sweets contained animal products such as gelatine in wine gums animal rennet in  crisps - remember Walkers cheese and onion; and don't get me started with Mars Bars, so nowadays I do my utmost to always check the labels. There is still some uncertainty as to whether Irn Bru is suitable for vegans, but I have been assured that it is suitable indeed.

Okay, having acquired my rather large bottle of Irn Bru for Burns Night - my Scottish theme night, I had great plans of creating lots of Irn Bru recipes, such as the Irn Bru ice-cream I had in Inveraray, Irn Bru Sorbet that I had in a Glasgow chip shop, Irn Bru Tablet somewhere in Ayrshire which I thoroughly enjoyed and Irn Bru Cake. However, the only one I managed to create was Irn Bru jelly.  Well I was real chuffed with myself, it truly did taste like Irn Bru, the only bit missing was the bubbles, fizz and burps! 

Maybe for my next Scottish evening I will try Buckfast!
I had two Irn Bru glass dishes left from my evening, on hearing this, one of my nephews took one for himself, the other he took home for the family to taste.  When I went over I asked them how they found it, my youngest brother was surprised at the idea of Irn Bru Jelly and excited to try it, then he learned that he missed out, so he was a bit mift with my nephew for not sharing a taste with him, so I may just have to make some more again - for a big kids party, his Birthday is in February!
Recipe will be posted later this week

12 comments:

  1. I used to love IRN BRU as a kid. Does it still outsell coca cola in Scotland?

    Loved the ads too.. Made from girders indeed!

    Jellies look lovely. I managed to find a veggie haggis in the supermarket this week, post Burns night. I love it.....!

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    1. So great to hear from you really. Happy New Year to you. Yes it does still outsell coca cola in Scotland. I do envy you finding veggie haggis in the supermarket, I had to make mine from scratch, not easily found in Wales, in fact I don't think I saw it anywhere here - good job I have an excellent recipe to fill that gap,

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  2. This is my first time hearing about this, but then again I'm from the U.S. Hahah

    Sounds very delicious and I like a lot of my "alcohol" drinks to be kept virgin. And IrnBru sounds very tempting. :)


    VegCourtesy.blogspot.com

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  3. I used to love Irn Bru! Australia really does seem a long way way sometimes...
    Loving your presentation too, made me smile :) x

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    1. Thanks Claire, must admit my loch ness monster has lost its tail.

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  4. I tried Irn Bru on my one visit to Scotland and it has appeared in the British section of our (Australian) supermarkets over the last few months. However, the one here is actually a variant not made in the UK and not quite the same as the Scottish one, which seems odd to me!

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    1. There is another Irn Bru sold in the U.K too, that is not the real thing but an attempt to mimic it. Anyway, the question is did you like it when you tried it?

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  5. I've not had Irn Bru for years - but I don't drink full sugar fizzy drinks any more and I don't think they do a sugar free, do they?

    Of course, it's one of the reasons why Scots have the worst teeth in the UK. The combination of acidity and sugar are just lethal for tooth enamel. I might try the jellies though.

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    1. NO I don't think they do sugarfree.

      Like you I don't drink many fizzy drinks, but I would recommend the jelly.

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  6. We enjoyed irn bru on our recent trip to scotland - it is a good thing we don't have it easily available as i love it but it is good in small quantities (not as a regular morning pick me up). I love your jelly and your ideas for irn bru cookery and might just need to try some myself - I do have a source in Melbourne but it is not somewhere I go regularly luckily! Maybe irn bru scones would be fun in a flour-cream-lemonade recipe using irn bru instead of lemonade

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    1. You bring on the scones and I will try and attempt the other Irn Bru delights later in the year. It could even be sooner in my case, as I have Irn Bru left over from last week as I won't be guzzling it down any time soon. I don't really like fizzy drinks much, make me burp too much.

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