Thursday, 22 November 2018

Turkish Manti or Mantu

A few months ago I made Turkish Mantu or Manti.  

It started as a means to find inspirational ways of using my spices such as AdviehBaharat, Sumac, Za'atar and ingredients such as Maftoul and Freekeh, but like any curious cook I had been lured and enticed by other recipes.  Some of you will have already seen my Iranian Pearl Barley Soup known as Ash-e Jo or Ash-e-Jow, Ghorme Sabzi, Etsis Turlu and more recently a Syrian Mezze
It was my first time making Turkish Manti or Mantu which are almond shaped dumplings filled with spicy oniony minced meat, of course my version is made with vegan/vegetarian soy mincemeat. However, I have since learned that you can also use mashed chickpeas spiced with chilli flakes and cumin as a delicious filling too and the dumplings do not necessarily have to be almond shaped either. 

Manti is a derivation of the word mantu which means dumpling.  Please see here to read and learn more about Manti or Mantu dumplings and its popularity in other countries including Armenia and Russia. 
Apparently making Mantu dumplings from scratch is a labour of love as you make the dough from scratch and then stuff it with the filling, however a Turkish woman told me that sometimes out of convenience she had used wonton or dumpling wrappers.   I guess its the way some people from the Indian subcontinent and diaspora have started using filo pastry for samosa.  So I cheated as I had some wonton dumpling wrappers in the freezer.  I have to admit, it looks pretty, but I have a feeling this dish would have been better with homemade dough.  I learn for next time as I know this is by no way authentic. 

On tasting it reminded me a little of wonton pot stickers - see here.  One part steamed and the crispy, but open - unsealed - so that you could see the filling.  Its also smothered in homemade tomato sauce, the kind you would use for lasagne - again my version is by no mean authentic. 
I'd make this again, with perhaps another filling like vegetables and serve it with some greens as well as make the pastry from scratch.

I think this recipe is suitable for vegans, but I did not check if the wonton wrappers were made with egg, so cannot say for definite...sorry.


Turkish Manti or Mantu Pastry from scratch
200 plain four
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon oil
50ml water
or use 40 ready made wonton wrappers
Method
Put the flour and salt into a bowl, then slowly mix with the oil. 
Add the water and knead to a soft dough.  Allow to rest for an hour.
Then roll out the dough thinly, then cut into squares 4 cm x 4 cm.  
Fill each one with the filling.
I will leave the vegetarian or vegan filling choice up to you. 
Squeeze the ends of the pasty so the filling does not spill out and stays intact.
Preheat oven to gas mark 4/180oc. 
Bake for 20 minutes.
Then pour in 150ml vegetable stock and pour over pastry pockets.
Bake again until all the liquid has evaporated. 
Inspired by Vegan Recipes from the Middle East by Parvin Razavi
and Other Manti recipes on the Internet
Turkish dumplings by Ozlem Turkish Table
Turkish Manti by Panning the Globe

10 comments:

  1. those photos of the manti with tomato sauce is really beautiful - I haven't heard of them but like the sound of them with chickpeas. Yours look so perfect but I would worry about filling them properly and baking them just right

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    1. Thank you Johanna, Yes I think I would prefer them with chickpeas next time.

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  2. How beautiful is this! The dish sounds lovely, but I might be too lazy to make it...

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    1. Thank you VegHog. I was lazy too hence why I used the wonton wrappers :)

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  3. It certainly does look pretty - I thought it was a cushion cover when it appeared on my feed!!

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    1. Thanks Belinda. Amused that you thought it was a cushion cover, but I can see why

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  4. I love dumplings! I love that they exist across culinary cultures, and I've never met one I didn't like, from dim sum to pierogi. I've never had mantu before, but they look divine. The geometric pattern when they're laid out like that is gorgeous!

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    1. Thank you Joey - I think you would like these then :)

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