Monday, 1 April 2019

Weekend in the Allotment Garden Plot

The last two weekends, the weather has been kinder that we decided not to go out exploring and instead spend time in the garden getting it ready for sowing and growing.  

Last week was hard.  Between the two of us we managed to accomplish a lot.  D fixed the greenhouse (not shown) that had all its panels blown out.  It used to be glass, but much of the glass has smashed over the years from bad weather.  Every year we salvage what we can and patch it up.  I am pleased to say it is ready for sowing seeds. 
While D got on with the greenhouse, I got on with digging the soil.  As you can see I did so much, but there is still so much to do, but I wanted to share some progress and growth - so please indulge me.  



 This is our plum tree, below it strawberries and rhubarb.
 
Delicate blossom
The blossom from the neighbours pear tree has covered my freshly dug ground like white confetti.  If you look close, next to the fence - you may see our potato rows.  There are two rows: one is Pentland Javelin and the other - the name escapes me. 

The weather is still a bit unpredictable, so I am holding of planting anything outside.
Rhubarb beginning to emerge strongly from the ground.
 Pretty pear blossom
Overwintered curly kale.  I have harvested the healthy leaves and will dig this up next week, but I decided to leave it in the ground this week as we had some big bees about and I wanted them to enjoy the yellow flowers.
Finally, this is the last of the rainbow chard, harvested at the weekend,, cooked and in my belly.  

I am sharing this with Harvest Monday hosted by Dave at Happy Acres Blog, along with the curly kale. The next time I join in will be with herbs and some lettuce cuttings, better than nothing I suppose!

18 comments:

  1. Those kale 'trees' are quite impressive! It's good you got the greenhouse fixed, since I am guessing it gets a lot of use this time of year. I had to do some repairs to ours, but I believe it will need to be replaced soon.

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    1. So funny, kale trees!

      Yes we have started tomatoes and salad in the greenhouse. Good luck with yours

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  2. Rainbow chard is so cheery in the garden.

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    1. I so agree, hence I like growing it so much. Sowed some seeds and some have started to emerge

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  3. Is this your backyard or a separate allotment - I had thought the former when I saw it previous but now I am wondering if this is the case. Your blossoms look so full of promise and I am sure the bees really love them. Glad you are enjoying some better weather.

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    1. Hi Johanna, its my back garden, but I like calling it a allotment to complient my blog name still. The bees are def. loving the blossom, but we had some hail today and blustery wind...

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  4. Ooh well done with all that digging. Love the blossom on that very statuesque plum tree! Also, Your garden looks cool, is it tricky with it being on such a slope? I remember marvelling at sloping gardens in Ilfracombe a long time ago

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    1. Thank you Belinda. I do feel the slope bites my back a bit when I am digging and toiling the land, but generally its okay to grow on. We also have to add more soil at the top as you can imagine, as it moves forward with the weather. Drawback we don't get to admire it from the house as the greenhouse is in the way, but as you can see there is a bench at the top that gives us a good view of the valleys behind the houses

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  5. I love your chard, and happy to hear you've had bees about. Veronica garden.

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    1. Thank you e - yes super deligted with the bees, but some have been a bit sleepy

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  6. You seem to have a very long growing season, and it's great that a few plants are already coming up. Rhubarb is easy for most people to grow, but we never had any success. Our yard is too shady for any food plants so we no longer even try -- just go to the farm markets.

    best... mae at maefood.blogspot.com

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    1. Yes Mae, its been a warmish winter compared to previous years ie no snow so I think that has made a difference. I don't think I was successful growing rhubarb when I lived in Scotland, but since moving to Wales it has been thriving with little help from us. Its a shame your yard is shady, but good to know that you have farmers markets near by to go to and support and enjoy seasonal produce

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  7. you are gardening on a bit of a slope! If nothing else you shouldn't get waterlogged and boggy!!
    Your garden is coming on well, all praise to you.

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    1. Yes gz I am. And true = not boggy at all. We have started some veg from seeds, but we will be picking some up from garden nurseries as well - we not as organised as we look. But thank you for the praise I will take it :)

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  8. I like to let some veggies bloom for the bees too. I often let cilantro (coriander) bloom for them and fennel too and then I can collect the seeds to cook with.

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    1. Thanks Michelle - yeah the bees do love blooms. I have never been successful in growing coriander and its a herb I adore eating, but yes fennel - yes. Double bonus the bees love it and then you get the seeds to cook with

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  9. This is gorgeous! I envy you! We are still under the snow here ;-(
    I cannot wait to see something pop up in the garden!
    Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Thanks Ephee. You are too kind. We have had thunder and hailstones today, but no snow (thank goodness). Hopefully you will see some growth when it melts away.

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