Friday, 4 May 2012

Wild Weed Tortilla

Last year I think I overdosed on wild garlic, not literally - just in a culinary sense.  I dubbed my two week wild garlic culinary binge as The Wild Garlic Chronicles, even cheekily Wild Garlic Girl.  So as you can imagine, I have been a little hesitant foraging for some this year, but whilst driving through a narrow lane a week or so back, I spotted some growing and decided to return to forage for some.  On return the wild garlic was shooting up its edible flower buds like firework sparklers.   

Its funny, around this time I struggled to find many Wild Garlic recipes in cookbooks and on the Internet, but this year - wow - there has been an explosion both the Internet and blogosphere and you can find lots of ideas and inspiration for your foraged wild garlic.  Other than the usual pestos, soups, breads, pasta dishes, potato cakes and egg dishes like frittata, souffles and quiches, you will find it in scones, quinoa patties to deep or shallow fried fritters, added to 'curry style' dishes, as well as enhancing traditional recipes like basic pastry, coleslaw, mayonnaise, aioli and salsa verdes .  Anyway, this was going to be a plain old 'Wild Garlic Tortilla', but having briefly visited my Dads allotment a couple of days ago I picked some wild stinging nettle and in my own garden some young dandelion leaves, so I decided to add some of these to the tortilla.  I wanted a little more texture too, so in place of my usual garden peas, I also threw in some cooked chickpeas.
I garnished the completed Wild Weed Tortilla with wild garlic flowers for optional extra heat, for those who dared for a little extra bite. 

My nephew who was out with friends said he strolled through a blustery farmers market this weekend and saw some pots of Wild Garlic Hummus being sold.  I couldn't help but wonder if the source of inspiration came from my humble blog and would this be acknowledged or not. Regardless I am proud to boast that presently my 'Wild Garlic Hummus' recipe ranks as number one, two and three on google.    I am sharing this pungent flowery recipe with Karen at Lavender and Lovage and Kate of What Kate Baked for their Tea Time Treats. The theme this month is Floral Flavours and Flowers.   I do hope my savoury flower submission is accepted with its edible wild garlic flower buds.  I know some days I would prefer a savoury tea time treat as opposed to to a sweet one. What about you?!
Wild Weed and Potato Tortilla
Serves 6 - 8 depending on appetite and cut slices
Ingredients
4 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium onion, sliced
4 - 6 medium potatoes, thinly sliced (preferably with a mandolin)

Salt and pepper to taste

1 tablespoon olive oil
A good handful of each: wild nettle, wild garlic and dandelion leaves, thoroughly rinsed, stalks removed and roughly chopped.
400g cooked chickpeas
6 eggs, beaten

Wild Garlic Flowers for Garnish
Method
Heat oil in a frying pan measuring about 9 inches with high sides. Heat oil, add the onion and cook until soften, then add in the potatoes and cook for about 10 - 15 minutes on medium heat until they are beginning to soften and turn golden, flipping them over now and again. Season with salt and pepper. Tip into a large bowl. In the same pan, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil, then stir in the wild weeds, and cook until wilted. Then tip back in the potatoes, add in the cooked chickpeas and stir well
to distribute the wild weeds, chickpeas and the onion. Adjust seasoning if necessary.
Gently pour in the beaten eggs, reduce the heat and allow to set, this may take a while. When it appears set and no longer soft in the middle. Cover the frying pan with a large plate or lid and invert the potato tortilla over onto the plate or lid. Then gently slide the upturned potato tortilla back into the frying pan. Increase the heat and cook the tortilla for a few more minutes until set and golden. Transfer the Wild Weed and Potato Tortilla onto a large serving plate and serve slices either warm or at room temperature. Garnish each slice with a wild garlic flower bud.  Based on this recipe of mine.

30 comments:

  1. Creating the number one googled recipe! It must feel great! And people copping and selling the recipe on a large scale is even great (although I wish they had given you some credit.)

    Your tortilla looks really delicious. I would any day come dine with you.

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    1. Yeah i am quite chuffed. Even my laverbread pies (see header) comes tops too :) I'd be delighted to ave you at my table.

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  2. I LOVE the title of this 'Wild Weed and Potato Tortilla', it just sounds so natural and frugal and RIGHT!!

    I'll give it a go with the nettles and dandelions (we have hundreds of those) but I've still to discover any wild garlic.

    Is it right that it's also called Ramps in some places?

    Sue xx

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    1. Thanks Sue. Your right, it is frugal - moreso if your hens are laying those eggs :) Oneday I will get chooks. Hope you find some wild garlic and Yeah they are also known as ramps in some parts of the world. I do like nettle, in fact its my favourite weed to eat.

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  3. Ooooh, this post made me go out for a forage. I have just had a 'Wild Weed, Ham, Cheese and Tomato' omelette. It was delicious. The wild garlic gave a lovely mild hint of garlic, I used buds and leaves. The nettles were my favourite, delicious taste and texture, I only used the young tips and who would have thought Dandelion and cheese would be a flavour match made in heaven? Thanks for the inspiration. :)

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    1. Yeah the wild garlic is quite mild. I love using the buds too. I agree with you about the nettle, they are far by my favourite wild weed.

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    2. Do you have any harvesting tips for Nettles, I have been stung through gloves and bags. They are delicious but boy oh boy those stings nip!

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    3. I tend to pick them whilst wearing thick goves and through plastic carrier bags, I have to admit I always still somehow get stung too by the nettles - I guess its one of the hazards of foraging. Sorry I can't offer any more different advice than what you are doing already.

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  4. That looks absolutely delicious Shaheen, you've succeeded in making me hungry again! I'm never going to get slim at this rate LOL.

    How does the wild garlic stand up to vampire attacks?

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    1. Oh I am so pleased Chris. Vampire attacks, let me tell you these smell strong and taste mild, so the verdict is still out.

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  5. You gotta love Garlic it sounds great...

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  6. Oh yum - I recently discovered wild garlic and love cooking with it! Luckily the patch isn't too near me so I only replenish when I'm in the area. Got to leave some for everyone else ;)

    That wild garlic hummus sounds like something I've got to try!

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    1. Thanks Philippa, I know you will love the wild garlic hummus.

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  7. This looks so tasty and it's sure very healthy! To be honest, I think I'll never had tortilla before.

    Here in Estonia, wild garlic is under protection, so we can't pick it from the nature. But we have some growing in our garden, thanks to my father. :)

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    1. You have to be careful foragign for wild garlic here too, esp. if its on private land then you need permission, but I think it is so plentiful that it should be enjoyed in season. I had planted a small patch in my old home too, it was doing well.

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  8. You can never have too much Wild Garlic! M x

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  9. This is so nice. A wild herb tortilla! Foraging is great and it feels good to find your own herbs! Well done!

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  10. Everywhere I read lately is about thistles and weeds in things. Funny how our lives run in themes. Having said that your tea time treat looks delicious and I agree with you sometimes you need a little savoury to keep the balance just right.

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    1. I guess its that time of year. I am so pleased you agree savoury at tea time is just as good.

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  11. Nice one, Shaheen. Probably very nutritious, but I don't think "Wild Weed Tortilla" would be seen as an attractive item on a restaurant menu!! (Unless it had chips with it...)

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    1. Thanks Mark - I think you would be surprised at how popular it would be on the menu, esp. if some celebrity chef was flogging it, me however - I am a very very small fish. And nope you don't want chips with it, really - its full of potatoes as it is.

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  12. This is JUST fabulous and I LOVE cooking with chive flowers.....such a BRILLIANT savoury entry for Tea Time Treats thanks! Shhh.....don't tell too many people, but I am MORE a savoury tea time treats person than a sweet one! Always gravitate to the cheese scones first!
    THANKS for this entry and OF COURSE I will accept it! It is FLORAL after all! Karen

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    1. Thank you Karen.
      i was a little nervous that it would be rejected on the note of being Savoury. Its so good to read that you too are a savoury tea time person - your secret is safe with me.

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  13. I agree that savoury tea time treats are a welcome change to the sweet ones - love all the wild weeds in this tortilla - and when I think wild garlic I think of all your creative recipes with it - am sure I am not alone in this - have you ever cooked with dried wild garlic?

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    1. Thanks Johanna, That does make me smile. No I haven't cooked with dried wild garlic, mmm maybe I'll pick some more this w/e and dry it in the oven for future use.

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  14. Looks marvellous!
    Unfortunately I missed most of the wild garlic season :( I had it only in a sauce with white asparagus and as pesto). Sad isn't it.
    But I will bookmark this recipe for next spring :)and the garlic flowers are sure pretty :)

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  15. Thanks Torwen,
    I haven't had much of an appetite for wild garlic this year, I think because I overdid it last year. On the plus side, since moving from Scotland to Wales, I have identified a few places to pick it, so I know where to go. No more hunting/sniffing for it.

    The white aspargus saucy dish sounds lovely.

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